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How To Connect With Potential Employers During Your Job Search

By Advice Column

It’s hard to be passionate about a job when you have no connection to the company. How do you show enthusiasm in your cover letter and job interview if you don’t absolutely love what you’d be doing, or where you’d be doing it?


Fortunately, there’s an easy way to demonstrate your enthusiasm for a company during the application and hiring process.

Here’s how you can make meaningful connections with potential employers during your job search.

1. Find Information About The Company

If you’re not totally excited about the company you’re hoping to get hired at, then it’s possible you just don’t know enough about them (or maybe they don’t belong on your interview bucket list). Before writing a cover letter, and especially before going in for an interview, you should always check out the company’s website.

Also, go to Glassdoor.com to see what past and current employees have to say about the company, and take a peek at their social media accounts. By doing this, you’ll get a better sense of their company culture and how they get involved in their community.

2. Reach Out To Current Employees

Man reaches out to connect with employees of the companies he wants to get hired at

Reaching out to the current employees of a company is the most direct way to form a connection with a potential employer. This is where LinkedIn comes in handy.

You should start a chat with current employees on LinkedIn, that way you’re getting an inside scoop of what it’s like to work at the company. And once you’ve connected with a person at the company on LinkedIn, you’ll feel a connection to the company itself by default.

3. Research The Company’s Values & Beliefs

Woman connects with a company while researching for her job search

A company’s core values and beliefs can greatly impact how passionate their employees are about their work. That’s why it’s important for you to know whether your personal values and beliefs align with the companies you’re hoping to get hired at.

In other words, would you be a good cultural fit?

This question is as important to you as it is for the potential employer.

While researching the company before you write your cover letter or go in for an interview, you should try to find information on their values and beliefs as an organization. Maybe once a month the company volunteers in the community. Maybe a percentage of their profits go to causes you support. Maybe they’re dedicated to environmental sustainability in all areas of their business. Whatever the company’s specific values and beliefs are, they’re perfect opportunities for you to connect with them.

4. Create A Connection Story

Man writes a connection story in his job search

After you do all of the above, you should have an excellent idea of what the company does, who they are, and what they stand for. Now, it’s time for you to create a connection story to tell in your cover letter and in your interview.

Start by answering this question: Did something happen to you that made you respect, appreciate, or admire what the company does?

You could be a loyal customer to this company, or a good friend of an employee. But if you didn’t already have that connection to the company, or that passion for what they do, you have it now from your research and your conversations with current employees.

In your cover letter and in your job interview, talk about how you were, or are, affected by the products and services the company provides.

To create a connection story that will stand out to employers, you need to connect your personal story to the company’s mission. If you do this, you’ll write a disruptive cover letter and be memorable in your interview.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free job search checklist

We hope these tips will help you connect with any potential employer you come across during your job search. You’ll probably become passionate about a company or employment opportunity you never considered before…it may just take a little research first.

Need more job search help? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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How To Answer Interview Questions About How You Handle Criticism

By Advice Column

Criticism comes with the territory in any job—and in life. So, in your job interview, the hiring manager will probably ask you about how you handle it.


It may come in the form of a behavioral interview question such as, “Describe a time when your work was criticized and how you handled it.” Your answer—the story you choose to and how you talk about it—will tell them a lot about your character and how you perform under pressure.

The truth is that in order to be successful, we all need to be open to criticism. If you aren’t, then you aren’t coachable. You won’t be open to learn things that make you better than you were before. And if you can’t do that, then you don’t grow and you never become as accomplished or as valuable as you could be in your career.

Ask Yourself, “Am I Coachable?”

Hiring manager asks a job candidate about how he handles criticism

The question we all need to ask ourselves is: “Am I coachable?” Our ability to take criticism and learn from it is crucial to our success. If you don’t take criticism well and always become defensive, eventually people will stop trying. That may feel nicer for you, but ultimately it hurts you. If your boss can’t communicate with you and help you to become better at your job, eventually they’ll just cut you loose.

No one is perfect. We can all learn and improve. Everyone can be corrected or coached to a new place. We’ll be better and stronger because of it.

How To Answer Interview Questions About How You Handle Criticism

Hiring manager asks a job candidate about how she handles criticism

What does a good criticism response story sound like?

Basically, if you’re asked about how you handle criticism in a job interview, your response should sound like this:

  1. Tell them about a time someone told you how you could do some task differently or better.
  2. Talk about how you responded and what you did after receiving the criticism (how you did that task better).
  3. Mention what the results were.

This structure fits the STAR technique (Situation or Task, Action you took, and Results). Many times, job seekers miss telling about the results of the story (what happened as a result of the action you took), and this is one of the most important parts.

As with all of your job interview answers, be strategic. Don’t choose a problem that someone criticized you about that is a central component of your job—for instance, an accountant who was criticized for her sloppy math would be a bad story to tell, no matter how much she improved. Choose something that is a side component. Maybe the accountant was weak in communication skills with colleagues but took a class and made an effort and now works collaboratively on six team projects per year. Whatever it is, talk about how you responded, how you became better, and give evidence of that.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free list of common interview questions

Hiring managers will always ask about adversity of one kind or another in interviews, so be prepared to talk about a few of these types of topics. Remember: it’s all about how you frame your criticism story!

Give interview answers that sell you for the job. Find more than 200 job-winning answers in How to Answer Interview Questions and How to Answer Interview Questions II, available on Amazon.

Need more help preparing for your next job interview? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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Top 5 Questions Hiring Managers Expect You To Ask In An Interview

By Advice Column

There are a few ways you can impress hiring managers in a job interview. You can stand out for your answers, your personality, aptitude, and experience, your knowledge of the company, and the questions you ask.


But which questions do hiring managers expect you to ask?

According to a recent study by Zety, there are a handful of questions hiring managers expect you to ask before the interview concludes. Here are the top five:

1. Can You Show Me Examples Of Projects I’d Be Working On?

Why a hiring manager wants to hear this: They want to know you’re serious about wanting the job, and excited to add value to the company from the very start. It shows initiative. If you’re already thinking about working on projects this early in the hiring process, that puts you way ahead of the other candidates who are just trying not to bomb the interview.

What their answer will tell you: You’ll get a sense of what your average project will look like. You’ll also be able to get a better idea if this is the type of work you want to do. Could you develop your skills working on these projects? Is this work that will challenge you to grow as a professional? If the hiring manager stumbles trying to answer this question, they might not have been completely transparent about what the position actually entails.

2. What Are The Skills And Experience You’re Looking For In An Ideal Candidate?

Man shakes the hand of the hiring manager before his job interview

Why a hiring manager wants to hear this: It shows you’re curious and that you want to know exactly what you need in order to succeed in the position. You are interested in being that ideal candidate. You are interested in being a successful employee.


What their answer will tell you: You’ll know exactly what they are looking for, all the skills and experience they didn’t mention in the job description. It also gives you another opportunity to prove you have the skills and experience they’re looking for. A great way to provide proof is by using the STAR technique we recommend job seekers use to answer behavioral interview questions.

3. What Are The Most Immediate Projects That Would Need To Be Addressed?

Hiring manager listens as the job candidate asks her a question during the interview

Why a hiring manager wants to hear this: Even more so than the first question on the list, this question shows that you are a proactive employee. You are already imagining yourself working for the company and contributing to its success. You are eager to add value and prove that you are an excellent employee.

What their answer will tell you: You’ll have a clearer understanding of what your first few months will look like on the job. It’ll help you imagine working for the company, and allow you to brainstorm ideas for the projects they mention. Also, it’ll help you plan ahead. In the case you do get the job, you’ll already be prepared to jump in and add value from your very first day.

4. What Does A Typical Day Look Like?

Man asks the hiring manager a question during his job interview

Why a hiring manager wants to hear this: They’ll know that you’re already imagining yourself in the position. Hiring managers are looking for serious job candidates. They’re not looking for candidates who don’t care what they’ll be doing day-to-day because those are usually the same candidates who are only interested in a paycheck.

What their answer will tell you: It’s simple. You’ll find out what a typical day in this position looks like. Don’t like what you hear? That’s probably a red flag. But if you like what the hiring manager says, that’s a good indication that you’ll be happy working the job.

5. Do You Expect The Main Responsibilities For This Position To Change In The Next Six Months To A Year?

Woman shakes the hiring manager's hand before her job interview

Why a hiring manager wants to hear this: You’re seeing if there is potential to stay at the company long term, either in the job you applied for or in a different position if you get promoted. They want to know you hope to stay at the company for longer than one or two years because it costs employers a lot of money to hire new employees. They might get the impression that you’ll be a loyal employee.

What their answer will tell you: It’ll tell you whether you’ll be expected to do tasks you weren’t originally hired for or not. If the hiring manager says the main responsibilities for the position will change, you can ask them to elaborate. Do the changes align with your career goals? Is that how you want to grow in the company, in your career? If not, you probably won’t see any long-term career potential there, and it might be best if you look for a job elsewhere.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free list of common interview questions

Never leave a job interview without asking the hiring manager a few questions. If you don’t ask at least one of the questions above, hiring managers might choose the candidate who does (if all else is equal). Just remember to ask the questions you really want to know the answers to, the questions that will help you decide whether or not you want to work for the company.

Need more help preparing for your next job interview? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

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How To Use The Law Of Attraction In Your Job Search

By Advice Column

Our thoughts are magnets that attract the outcomes we are thinking about. Even if you want something desperately, if your thoughts say you will never get it, guess what? You won’t.

However, if you change your thoughts on achieving it, you will.


This is mostly because if your thoughts are laser-focused on getting or accomplishing something, you will do the right things in order to make it happen.

This principle is commonly known as the Law of Attraction, and can be applied to many areas of your life. Whether it’s getting well, losing weight, quitting smoking, competing at peak levels, or finding a job, your attitude is crucial to success. Believing you can do something provides the strength and stamina to overcome the obstacles in your path. Positive thinking propels a small engine successfully up a mighty hill.

If you’re struggling in your job search, try applying this principle. By changing your thoughts, you will reach your goal.

Notice the attitudes and actions of successful job candidates. They are positive and enthusiastic. They keep their heads up high and smile. They believe from the bottom of their being they will get a job. The unsuccessful candidates walk around saying there aren’t any jobs, they will never find anything, and other negative thoughts.

So, how can you use the Law of Attraction to find job search success? Follow these seven tips.

7 Ways To Use The Law Of Attraction In Your Job Search

Man lands an interview after using the law of attraction in his job search

  1. Think positively. Deep down, not just on the surface. You can’t just say you are thinking positively.
  2. Believe in you. Don’t allow others to bring you down. You have the power.
  3. Align what you think and what you do to what you want. It won’t work if your actions and thoughts are contradictory to the goal. If you don’t think you will get it, you won’t do what it takes to get it.
  4. Know you are going to get a job. Talk about when you get a job rather than if you get a job.
  5. Write down what your ideal job is. Concentrate on it.
  6. Imagine doing that job. Use guided imagery to assist in this step.
  7. Don’t allow yourself to become discouraged. If you do, look for all the positive things in your life, and focus on them.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free job search checklist

As with all things, practice makes perfect. If you aren’t used to thinking this way, it will take some getting used to. But continue working on it. Career success will be yours if you do.

“You are a living magnet. What you attract into your life is in harmony with your dominant thoughts.” —Brian Tracy

Need more help with your job search? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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How To Customize Your Resume

By Advice Column

Sometimes there’s the thinking that stuffing a resume with a wide range of skills and experience will do the trick. But an overstuffed resume can dilute the message of how you’re a perfect fit for the job you’re applying for.


To captivate a hiring manager’s attention, you need a customized resume that is specific to the job. Here are some great ways to customize your resume.

Utilize Keywords

@j.t.odonnell

NEVER DO THIS ON THE TOP OF YOUR RESUME ##resume ##resumetips ##jobsearch ##jobsearchtips ##career ##careertips ##careers ##careercoach ##careeradvice ##work ##1

♬ original sound – J.T. O’Donnell

https://www.tiktok.com/embed.js

Think of your resume as a search engine with results

The key is not to bombard your resume with information that is irrelevant to the job, but to be as specific and relevant as possible. The most relevant information always comes up at the top of the search engine and that’s what you have to do on your resume.

The top fold of your resume should contain 6-8 major skill sets that you have that also relate to the job you’re applying for (just like keywords in a search engine).

Make it easy for a hiring manager to identify why you’re a perfect match for the job.

Narrow Your Focus

Young professional works on her resume.

You want your resume to showcase that you’re a specialist and expert in the field of work, not a generalist. As hard to believe as it may be, that’s the truth in the case of resumes. Remember, your resume is there to help get your foot in the door of the employer.

You have to first understand what the employer is looking for and specifically address that need for them to want to talk to you. If you come off saying you can do everything else, it can impact your message from getting across in those quick seconds that a hiring manager takes to review your resume.

Carefully review the job posting to really understand what the employer is looking for and focus your resume to address those specific points.

Think Like An Employer

Professional attempts to think like an employer when putting together her resume.

Put yourself in the employer’s position to answer the key questions they have, like:

  • “What can you do for me?”
  • “How is your experience relevant to the job?”
  • “Do you have examples to demonstrate how you’ve succeed in your career?”
  • “Are you able to achieve those results again on this job?”

You can expect better results with your resume when it’s tailored to an employer’s specific need. And remember, employers receive more resumes than they need to go through, so when your resume requires digging for relevant information, you’ve already lost them.

Looking to stand out in the job search?

Join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Did you know?

Work It Daily highlights job openings on a daily basis! You can find these opportunities on Work It Daily’s Incredible Companies page or on Work It Daily’s TikTok page.

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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5 Reasons You’re Still Unemployed

By Advice Column

“Why am I still unemployed?”

At Work It Daily, we’re asked this question a lot. The reality is, the reason is different for everyone. The good news? Whatever is holding you back from getting hired, you can overcome.


Here are five reasons you’re still looking for a job:

1. Your Resume Isn’t Job Specific

While it’s good to have a strong resume with all of your professional skill sets, your resume can become generic when all you do is send the same resume to every open position you find.

The Solution: Customize your resume for each job you apply for. By taking the time to customize your resume with relevant skill sets and specific keywords that are in the job description, you’ll be more likely to land an interview, and therefore, will have more viable job opportunities.

2. You’re Overqualified

Unemployed man looks for a job

This problem is common among older workers looking for a career change. But this can happen to anyone who has a lot of experience and is trying to get their foot in the door at another company.

The Solution: During an interview, make it your mission to connect with the employer. Tell a story. Let them know you aren’t just running out the clock. If they ask about your 5-year plan, don’t mention retirement. Your career isn’t over yet.

3. You’re Underqualified (Or Lack Exposure To The Professional World)

Young woman looks for a job while unemployed

On the flip side, you could be unemployed because you don’t have enough experience or the right skill sets to do the jobs you’ve been applying for. Maybe you’re a recent college grad, and at this point, you’re just begging someone to give you a chance. Whatever your situation, employers are making it very clear you aren’t qualified.

The Solution: Take classes or earn certificates to try to develop new skills. Volunteer or intern to get the type of professional experience employers are looking for. Focus on the skill sets you do have, and learn how to quantify those skills on your resume to stand out to hiring managers.

4. You’ve Stopped Being Proactive In Your Job Search

Unemployed man loses motivation in his job search

If you really want a job, your actions have to reflect your attitude. As the weeks (or maybe months) drag on and you still haven’t found a job, you may find yourself getting into a dangerous job search routine. You apply for half a dozen jobs every day and hope for the best. This strategy rarely works. If you want quality job opportunities, you need to be proactive.

The Solution: Make networking a priority. Go to job fairs. Reach out to employees at companies you’d love to work for on LinkedIn. Start compelling, professional conversations with them. Remember: you’re a business-of-one. The better you actively market yourself to employers, the more job opportunities you’ll likely receive.

5. You’ve Lost All Urgency

Unemployed woman stressed about finding a job

It can be easy to get into a job search rut. Time goes by differently when you don’t have a set routine. The longer it takes for you to find a job, the harder it is find the motivation to get a job. You may begin to lose confidence in yourself and your skills as a professional. When your career is suddenly on hold, your life can feel like it is without purpose or direction.

The Solution: Set goals and work towards them—even if they’re just small goals. They could be career-related goals, or not. Maybe you want to get in better shape. Maybe you want to learn a new skill. If you set goals for yourself, you’ll regain that sense of purpose—and better yourself in the process.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free job search checklist

Being unemployed is tough. If you follow these tips, you’ll have the tools to overcome the challenges you face in the job search process.

Struggling to find a job? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!


This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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How To Create An Effective Resume Even If You Were Fired

By Advice Column

How can you make an effective resume after getting fired? People get fired from the job for various reasons. However, to a potential new employer, it may leave an unfavorable connotation on the candidate.


If you find yourself in such a situation, you may have a number of questions concerning how to address the adverse reactions a you may receive from a potential employer. You may have questions, such as:

  • How do I impress an employer given I was fired from my last job?
  • Do I include the job on my resume?
  • How should I answer when asked the reason for departing my previous job?

Understandably, there are many questions on your mind. And yet, there are ways to be truthful in answering the questions your potential new employer may have for you, along with tips to make such a situation feel a little less threatening.

Essentially, before updating your resume for the next job opportunity, think about:

Is The Experience From Your Last Position Relevant?

If there is little to no relevance between the positions, you do not have to showcase it on your resume. The hiring company is primarily interested in relevant experience and skills you can bring to their company. You may be able to break your resume into “Relevant Experience” and “Additional Experience” sections.

How Long Were You In The Position?

If you were in the position for only a few months, it may not be necessary to mention it on your resume. Determine if the gap of unemployment, should you choose not to include it, would be cause for concern by an employer. In today’s market, it’s not a surprise to see some candidates unemployed for a year before finding a new job.

How Severe Was The Cause For Firing?

Were you laid off or fired due to lack of performance or conditions outside of your control? If the latter, then you should put on the resume the reason such as “Major Downsizing,” “Company Relocated,” or “Management Reorganization,” all of which indicate that the termination was not due to your performance.

If the reason you were terminated was due to a minor issue that can be easily explained and seen from your point of view by a potential employer, than including the position on your resume should not be a concern. Be honest with yourself and think through your response to a potential interviewer.

Your answers to the questions above will tell you whether it is appropriate to include the job on your resume. If it is included, consider the following to help you through the application and interview process.

1. Showcase Your Achievements And Accomplishments

Woman writes a resume after being fired

Your mission is to get your foot in the door for an interview and to make an outstanding impression. You do not need to bring up that you were fired or laid off from your last job on paper, especially if you were only there for a year or two. Instead of focusing on how your previous job ended, quantify what you accomplished while you were employed there.

If necessary, you will have the opportunity during an interview to explain further details.

2. Don’t Insult Your Past Employer

Man edits his resume after getting fired

Even if you were fired and have bitter feelings toward your former boss or co-workers, your resume is not the time nor the place to reveal it. It is seen as unprofessional and leads to questions that focus on negative aspects.

So, even if the interviewer wasn’t planning on asking you the reason for leaving, you may have just brought it upon yourself by insulting your past employer or hinting at a conflict there on your resume.

3. Don’t Lie About Your Employment

Woman struggles to write her resume after being fired

You should never lie on your resume. Don’t fabricate anything on your resume or your reason for looking for a new job. If asked about this during an interview, you need to address the question truthfully, but keep it brief regarding the reason for your departure and move on to more positive points. At least you now have your foot in the door and have a greater advantage to explaining the reason for departure in a more positive light.

You can also use it to your advantage to reinforce points of achievements and accomplishments that may apply for the job. Remember that companies do check references and background information. Any candidate caught lying is grounds for dismissal.

4. Pull Together Your References

Man pulls together his references after getting fired

Gather people you worked with on the job as references, whether it’s co-workers, clients, or vendors. Individuals who worked with you on the job and who can speak positively about your work can help effectively rid any negative connotations associated with being fired.

In this instance, it makes sense to include references with your resume, especially written recommendations.

5. Focus On Functionality Rather Than Chronology

Woman applies for jobs after getting fired

This is a last resort option. Functional resumes typically are not used since it lacks detail on dates of employment—information most employers want to know.

A functional resume focuses on grouping specific skills and experiences together as the highlight of the resume. This type of format might also work for the career changer and those with gaps in employment history that are due to other pursuits, such as education or family.

This is the last resort, though. We recommend using a chronological resume format, even if you got fired. But it might be worth it to try a functional resume format if the chronological format isn’t working for you.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free resume mistakes guide

Being fired means you have an additional hurdle to overcome to find a new job, but it is not insurmountable. It’s all in the way you frame it on your resume and handle yourself in addressing the matter if the subject comes up. Remain positive, address any concerns succinctly and honestly, and then move on to the more positive highlights.

Need more resume help? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!


This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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4 Ideal Questions To Ask In A Phone Interview

By Advice Column

In every interview it’s important to ask questions. This especially includes phone interviews.


Asking questions during any type of job interview makes you seem more intelligent and interested in the job. It also makes you more appealing to hiring managers—as long as you don’t ask questions you could easily find the answers for with a Google search. If you ask the right questions, you also gain a strategic advantage. You can find out what the interviewer really cares about.

So, what questions are the best ones to ask?

Here are four ideal questions to ask during a phone interview:

1. If You Could Choose The Perfect Job Candidate, What Qualifications, Experience, Or Characteristics Would That Person Have?

You can simplify this question a couple of different ways:

  • “What does your ideal candidate look like?”
  • “What’s on your wish list for an absolutely perfect candidate?”

Some job seekers are a little afraid to ask this question because they don’t want to highlight their imperfectness—but that isn’t what this question does. Their answer gives you a blueprint of what they really hope to find, which means that you can tailor all your answers to their questions much more closely than you could without this information. Your answers will stand out from your competition.

2. Why Did The Last Person In This Role Leave The Job?

Man writes down questions for a phone interview

If the previous person was promoted, what was their next job title? Is that typical? Is that where you’d like to end up? What did they do to get promoted? These are things that could help you know how to be successful in the role and decide if it fits with your chosen career path.

If the person was fired or left the company, the reason why may give you valuable information as well.

3. What Are The Biggest Challenges Of This Position?

Woman asks a question during a phone interview

Every position has a certain number of problems and challenges associated with it.

If you know what their biggest problems and challenges are, you can talk more effectively about how you can solve them and help the company. You’ll sell yourself for the job.

4. From What You’ve Told Me, I Think I’d Be A Great Fit For The Job And I’m Very Interested. When Can We Schedule A Time To Discuss This Further?

Man smiles after asking a question during a phone interview

In any interview, it’s important to ask for the next step. This question, or a version of this question, will allow you to show your excitement for the opportunity and eagerness to move forward.

By demonstrating your enthusiasm and interest, you’ll automatically stand out to potential employers, and you’ll actually give yourself a better chance of making it to the in-person interview.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free list of common interview questions

Asking questions like these brings out information you can’t learn anywhere else. They’ll help you show your professionalism and interest in the job. Make a list of questions to ask and keep it in front of you during the interview. (That’s one of the advantages of phone interviews—they can’t see you.)

Along with these questions, you’ll probably have a few more that specifically address that job. Just make sure to write them down so you don’t freeze up and forget in the stress of the call.

Take the time to prepare for your phone interview and make sure you get invited to the in-person interview. Discover more phone interview tips and download a free phone interview prep podcast here. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a Work It Daily-approved expert.


Need more help acing your next phone interview? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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5 Tips For A Career Change Resume

By Advice Column

Writing a career change resume can be tricky. How can you effectively market yourself to employers in a different industry when you don’t have nearly enough experience as the average candidate applying for the same job as you?


If you’re looking to make a career change, optimizing your resume becomes even more important than it normally is. It’s also critical to write a disruptive cover letter and make strategic networking and intentional branding the priority.

Follow these five tips for an effective career change resume so you can land your dream job in a new industry.

1. Create An Interview Bucket List

An interview bucket list is a list of 10-20 companies you’d love to work for. Before beginning your job search as a career changer, having an interview bucket list is a must.

How can you identify the right companies to add to your interview bucket list? Well, it’s simpler than it sounds. Think about the companies you admire—for their mission, their product or service they provide, or both. Then, determine whether you could find an opportunity at these companies that aligns with your career change goals.

When creating your interview bucket list, you’re ultimately looking for companies you connect with. Why are you passionate about working for them? Tell that connection story in your disruptive cover letter. Then, you’ll be able to target your resume for specific job openings at these companies, customizing it for each position that you apply for. Which leads to our next tip for a career change resume…

2. Highlight Your Transferable Skills

Man writes a career change resume

Transferable skills are hard skills that are in-demand across many different roles and industries. As a career changer, highlighting your transferable skills on your resume is the key to looking as qualified as possible for the position you’re applying for.

Never include soft skills on your resume. It doesn’t matter whether you’re changing careers or not. Soft skills cannot be quantified. Therefore, they do not belong on your resume.

For example, “detail-oriented” is a soft skill and “project management” is a transferable skill. You may not have experience managing the types of projects in the industry you’re looking to get a job in, but if you have the skill, it’s likely you’ll be able to transition into a role that requires project management smoothly.

3. Focus On Your Accomplishments

Woman writes a career change resume

In the “Work History” section of your resume, you’ll want to focus on what you accomplished in previous roles, keeping your transferable skills in mind. For each role you list, you should have at least three bullet points detailing your quantifiable accomplishments.

Employers want to see what you accomplished in your previous roles and how those accomplishments could translate to success in their industry. They don’t care about what your tasks or responsibilities were. That won’t tell them the value you provide as a business-of-one.

What accomplishments are you most proud of in your career? Write those down. Hiring managers will probably be impressed by them, too.

4. Avoid Irrelevant Information

Man writes a resume for his career change

Any irrelevant information you include on your career change resume will hurt your chances of getting an interview. Hiring managers spend only seconds reviewing each resume that comes across their desk. If they can’t easily identify relevant information, they’ll assume you aren’t qualified for the position and toss your resume.

Only including relevant information on your resume will be difficult if you’re changing careers. But if you follow the tips above, you should be on the right track.

5. Use The “Additional Experience” Section To Your Advantage

Woman writes a resume for her career change

The “Additional Experience” section of your resume is the perfect place to showcase more relevant work or volunteer experience for the industry you’re looking to switch to.

Did you volunteer at an organization within the same industry? Have you worked on special projects that involved the industry in some way? This section is where you should include any remaining relevant information you believe makes you qualified for the job you’re applying for.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free resume mistakes guide

These five tips will help you write an effective career change resume. Just remember the importance of strategic networking and intentional branding in your job search as well.

In order to get your resume in front of hiring managers, you’ll likely need to go around the ATS and focus on networking your way into companies by connecting with current employees of these companies on LinkedIn. Customizing your resume, writing a disruptive cover letter, and having a solid networking strategy will help you successfully change careers.

Need more help with your career change? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

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10 Ways Employees Can Be More Proactive At Work

By Advice Column

Proactivity, as defined by organizational behavior, is “anticipatory, change-oriented, and self-initiated behavior in situations, rather than just reacting.” When a person is proactive, they are acting in advance of a future event. Proactive employees typically don’t need to be asked to do something, and will usually require less-detailed instructions.


Proactive behavior is applicable to either one’s own role, or to “extra role” responsibilities. Within one’s own role, for example, a person may find a more efficient way to complete one or more of their responsibilities. Extra role responsibilities (i.e. those tasks outside of your stated job description) speak to an employee’s organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The proactive employee would, for example, initiate an offer of help their co-workers before they are asked to assist by either their colleagues or their manager.

The steps you can take to become more proactive at work apply to both your formal role and your part of the scope of the OCB within your team, your department, and your overall organization.

There are variations on the theme, however, the following behaviors are a common foundation for proactivity within all of the theories:

Organize | Take Stock | Be Positive

Proactive employee helps coworkers

Proactivity requires that you be organized. That includes your mindset, your space, and of course, your schedule! Organizing your time helps you approach tasks more efficiently and allows you to be more open to opportunities. This scheduling needs to include “downtime” for those activities that keep your life in balance.

A positive attitude is right up there on any list. Approaching tasks from a positive perspective encourages you to look for the best in every situation. It helps you become the employee who is “ready, willing, and able,” who can always be counted on. A team player who is reliable and available will become the go-to person, the problem solver.

Take stock of your current responsibilities:

  • What are your tasks?
  • What are the priorities?
  • What can be consolidated, eliminated, shortened?
  • What can you do to stay ahead of less urgent tasks?
  • How do you solve problems?
  • Can you prevent them by planning ahead and developing alternative processes in anticipation?
  • What are the things you still need to know?
  • Can you automate any of your tasks to make them more effective and less time-consuming?

Communicate | Connect | Network

Proactive employees lead a meeting at work

Find a role model by observing the leaders in your company. When possible, spend time with them to gain insight from their behaviors. Try out their techniques. Some will work for you, others will not. You’ll need to fine-tune what you acquire so that you are able to build your own repertoire.

Let others know that you want to be more involved. You’ll need to create your own opportunities. Don’t wait to be asked—present your ideas to your management team.

Goals | Persistence | Excellence

Proactive employees work on a project together

Set goals for yourself. Write them down! List everything that you want to accomplish. Set deadlines! Once you have the end in mind, you can achieve your desired outcome. A series of small goals leading up to the completion of a large goal keeps tasks from becoming insurmountable.

Stay the course on how you want to accomplish your goals. This may require overcoming your fears and rising above obstacles or setbacks. You’ll need to step outside of your comfort zone and become increasingly resilient.

Strive for excellence from start to finish. Commit yourself to always presenting your best work—your completed project with no loose ends. Be passionate about what you do. Give it your all. No matter what the role you are assigned, you will be more effective when you put your full energy and effort into it.

Celebrate! | Be Flexible!

Proactive employees celebrate their success

Celebrate your successes, big and small, as you move along your path to becoming more proactive!

Be flexible! You can’t plan for every outcome, so being able to react to the unexpected is an important trait for the proactive person. It is about the awareness of the existence of choices, regardless of the situation or the context.

Want more tips for being a proactive employee and growing your career? We can help!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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5 Reasons To Follow Up In Your Job Search

By Advice Column

Many job seekers miss the one step that can land them an interview and the job they’re applying for. Sure, they send in their resume or job application—they may even send the additional information requested—but many job seekers and unemployed professionals simply fail to follow up with the employers they applied to.


Why follow up? Here are five good reasons:

1. Consideration

Man follows up with an employer

Care to guess how often a resume or job application fails to get past the ATS or is not received by the right person or department? I didn’t think so! Following up can ensure your resume was received so you can be considered for the job you thought you applied for.

If an employer doesn’t have your information, you won’t be considered. It’s that simple!

2. Recognition

Woman writes a follow-up email during her job search

Any contact with an employer is a chance to stand out from the rest of the applicants. Following up will allow the employer to place a voice or face with the name. If everything else is equal, the employer will be more likely to call an applicant they’ve interacted with in some way other than one they have not.

Remember: you can also stand out from other job applicants by writing a disruptive cover letter.

3. Impression

Man follows up with an employer during his job search

Employers, regardless of industry, are looking for eager, proactive workers who go the extra mile. Following up is a simple way to show you meet this expectation.

4. Information

Woman contacts an employer to follow up about her job application

Following up may allow you to obtain additional information about the job, employer, or interviewer that may give you an edge in an interview.

In most cases, it’s best to do your research on the company you’re applying to before you submit your application. It will also help you connect with employers during your job search.

5. Interview

Man asks about an interview while following up with an employer

As you follow up with an employer after submitting your job application, you could ask to schedule an interview at their earliest convenience, if you feel like that’s an appropriate question to ask at the time. Again, employers are looking for eager, proactive workers who go the extra mile. Be one!

All this seems to make sense, so why don’t more applicants follow up on their resume? Usually it boils down to just one thing: fear!

It may be fear of rejection. This is often the case; job seekers have to apply for so many jobs to get an interview and finally a job offer, they come to view even non-contact as rejection. Given they are rejected virtually every time they apply for a job, most are not inclined to stick their neck out only to be further rejected. Others feel a fear of failure and worry they will not be able to conduct themselves well in a follow-up situation. What if they “flub up?” That will surely ruin any chance they might have had to be interviewed and potentially offered a job, they think.

Some job seekers even fear that they will look too pushy or bother the employer if they try to follow up. Not so! As long as you know how to correctly follow up with an employer, you won’t get on their bad side.

How To Overcome Your Follow-Up Fears

Woman nervous about following up with an employer

Notice a recurring theme? A job seeker has to overcome his or her fears to apply for jobs and to follow up. So, how does a job seeker overcome his or her fears and follow up? Several things will help:

  1. Target those employers for which there is special interest and/or opportunity.
  2. Research those employers to the best of your ability.
  3. Just do it. Jump in and start calling or emailing the employers on the list, also known as the interview bucket list.
  4. If an employer does not respond by phone, try email, and vice versa.

Much like the application process, following up will provide success the more often it is done. More follow-up equals more interviews/job offer. Not that you shouldn’t be smart about what you apply for or follow up on, but you should actively do both.

Remember, as a job seeker you are only looking for the one employer who is offering you the job—not those who aren’t!

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free job search checklist

Need more help with your job search? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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Common Grammar Rules For Resumes

By Advice Column

The simple purpose of the resume is to get you noticed and have employers contact you for an interview. To achieve this, resumes will typically break some common grammar rules.


For example, all sentences are written like headlines without pronouns. Employers won’t be asking whose resume it is when your name is already on it, front and center. It is therefore unnecessary to include pronouns like “I” or “my” anywhere on your resume.

Resumes need to read like quick, bite-size bits of information. Adding pronouns can make the information difficult to digest because there is unnecessary clutter around the facts the hiring manager wants to know.

For instance, a resume including pronouns would read something like this:

I launched the product to a new international market. My efforts resulted in the company’s sales revenue doubling within 2 years.

A more effective approach would read:

Launched product to new international market, doubling company’s sales revenue within 2 years.

See how the latter version says the same thing, but gets to the point quicker? Also notice how we did not spell out “two” because numbers draw the eye to your sentence.

Here are some common grammar rules around resume writing:

6 Common Grammar Rules To Follow In Your Resume

Hiring manager checks a job candidate's resume for proper grammar

Forget about “I.”

There is no need to use “I” anywhere in your resume. For bullet points, just start with an action verb like “Delivered,” “Achieved,” “Produced,” etc. Follow these actions verbs with quantifiable accomplishments and you’ll stand out to recruiters and hiring managers.

Keep your sentences in the first person.

Hiring managers will cringe if they see that your resume is written in the third person. It’s even worse if you switch up points of view halfway through your resume. “Excel in developing comprehensive financial models,” is correct (first person) whereas “Excels in developing comprehensive financial models,” is not correct (third person). For all non-current positions, you can use the past tense so you won’t have to worry about using the wrong point of view.

Keep sentences short.

Fragments are encouraged. Long, descriptive sentences and bulky paragraphs are not going to impress recruiters and hiring managers. Why make it harder for them to figure out what kind of value you provide?

Use bullet points for achievements so they are noticed.

Break down information into easily digestible bits. Big blocks of text will likely get skimmed or overlooked entirely. Short bullet points where you quantify your work experience (using numbers) will definitely get you noticed by all the right people.

Take out fluff.

All you need is simple language. Do not use flowery phrases that would not come up in normal conversation. Any kind of resume fluff will hurt your chances of getting a call from an employer. Hiring managers will see right through it. When it comes to your resume, less is more.

Show the most important achievement first, starting with the quantifiable accomplishment.

For example, “Reduced costs 40% by bringing services in house.” It’s all about grabbing and keeping attention. If you can grab and keep a hiring manager’s attention while they’re reviewing your resume, you’ve already gotten much farther in the hiring process than most of the job candidates.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free resume mistakes guide

Remember that employers generally scan your resume for eight seconds to do the preliminary screening that puts you in the yes, no, or maybe pile, so follow the rules above for the best results!

Need more help writing your resume? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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Reactive vs. Proactive Job Search Strategies

By Advice Column

There are two kinds of job searches, reactive and proactive. Most people use reactive job search strategies, which means they look for job openings and then apply to the ones that interest them. So, when you send your resume to recruiters and respond to job board postings, you are really at the mercy of what comes up.


In a proactive job search, you pick the companies and the jobs you are seeking. This way, you get the job that you chose and worked to get versus just hoping a good job comes your way through the recruiters and job boards.

Before you start your job search, make sure you have a well-optimized resume and LinkedIn profile, since employers will use these to see if you’re a great candidate for the job. Once you’ve updated those, you’re ready to begin your proactive job search.

Here are four key steps in a proactive job search.

1. Identify Which Companies Interest You

Young woman researches companies for her proactive job search

There are a number of ways you can identify companies. Start by making a list of 10-20 companies that you think you would love to work for. This is your interview bucket list.

Talk to your friends and colleagues and see who they recommend as well. Note that LinkedIn has a very strong company search feature that can help. Go to LinkedIn, hit the menu button the the search bar, select “Companies,” and then search. If you find a company that might interest you, click on their profile and see if you’re passionate about a product or service they provide, or their mission.

If you are, then you should probably add the company to your list.

2. Research The Companies

Man researches companies for his proactive job search

The next step in a proactive job search is to learn more about the organization and determine if it is a place you really want to work. There are a number of ways to do this. The first thing to do is to visit the company website and go to the “About Us” section. You can review the company history, products, and services, and make sure you check out the “News” and “Press Releases” section to see the latest newsworthy events.

Make sure you look at their blog, too—if they have one—as it gives you a good idea of their areas of expertise and corporate culture. Also check out all of their social media accounts to get a better idea of the company culture, and remember to follow them.

Also, there are a number of excellent tools like Glassdoor that provide anonymous reviews of thousands of companies, salaries being paid, reviews of the corporate culture, and evaluations of top executives. Sometimes they will even show you questions that are asked in an interview. It’s a good idea to research companies on this site and on similar sites during your proactive job search.

3. Leverage Your Network

Woman leverages her network during a proactive job search

Go back to LinkedIn’s company search capability and enter the name of the company that interests you. Note that when the listing comes up, it will tell you how many people in your network are employed there. This is a good place to start and you can reach out to these people for assistance.

Tip: People respond much better when they are asked for advice versus being asked to help you get a job.

A good message to send to your connections on LinkedIn might be “I am looking at XYZ as a potential employer and was wondering if you could tell me about the corporate culture there?” You can also send this type of message to your extended network.

4. Reach Out To Hiring Managers

Father conducts a proactive job search

Now that you have identified companies that interest you, it is time to identify people who work there. Again, LinkedIn is a great tool here.

Start by identifying the hiring manager and staff in the area you wish to join. Look for people who would be your peers and their managers.

Now see what LinkedIn Groups they’ve joined. This is important because if you join the same group, you can now communicate with them for free without updating your LinkedIn account.

Look to see if they have participated in any group discussions. This is a great way to enter the conversation and start showcasing your expertise. And remember to keep your comments upbeat, positive, and professional.

Do the same for Twitter. Select the contact button under their profile and see if they have a Twitter handle. Follow them and see what kinds of tweets they have put out. Again, a terrific way to join the conversation.

Now look to see if you have people in your LinkedIn contacts that can provide an introduction to them. Ask what they know about the company and do they recommend them as a potential employer? Ask them what they think is the best way to get introduced.

Note that you did not ask them to introduce you, but rather you asked them for advice on how to get introduced. You’re not asking for a favor.

Finally, reach out to the hiring manager. Make sure you have a good 30-second elevator pitch that briefly describes your background and value proposition. And remember that people hire people they like so try to build rapport.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free job search checklist

A proactive job search takes discipline so set weekly goals for yourself. The benefit is you will end up in a job that you chose instead of one you got through happenstance.

Need more help with your job search? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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3 Important Career Lessons Learned On And Off The Field

By Advice Column

I’ve been thinking a lot about athletes and sports recently.

Part of this is because I’ve had the opportunity to get to know Chris Gronkowski and to learn his amazing story about how he made the transition from pro football player to inventor and CEO of Ice Shaker.


Another reason for this is because the Super Bowl was held recently and it featured 43-year-old Tom Brady winning his seventh championship. As I watched the game, I couldn’t help but think that between Brady’s success on the field, and Gronkowski’s success off the field, there are a lot of lessons that both pro athletes and working professionals can learn from these two, particularly about taking chances and finding success.

Here are a few lessons that come to mind.

Don’t Be Afraid Of Change

Whether you’re changing companies, or changing careers, some professionals are naturally a little apprehensive. While it’s okay to be a little nervous, it becomes problematic when you hold yourself back and start making excuses for not making a change.

  • I’ve had too much success to make a change now.
  • I’m too old to make a change.
  • I wouldn’t know where to start.

All of these excuses can only hold you back, and are easy to overcome if you’re willing to take some action.

In Gronkowski’s case, he was pushed into early retirement because of lingering injuries, but had some experience helping his wife build her online startup business. Knowing how difficult it can be for pro athletes to transition into new careers, Gronkowski decided to throw himself into his wife’s business in hopes of eventually becoming an entrepreneur himself.

Gronkowski knew that entrepreneurship could be risky, and that he had a lot to learn, but Gronkowski ultimately felt that not making a change at all would be a greater risk. Gronkowski would go on to spend five years helping his wife build a successful gift personalization business.

Brady switching football teams may not seem as dramatic, but after spending 20 years with one football team and having the level of success he had in New England, no one would’ve blamed him if he decided to stay put or retire.

While the outside world will never know every factor that went into Brady’s decision to go to Tampa Bay, I think most people can respect the idea of wanting a new challenge and opportunity to achieve success somewhere different.

You Define Your Own Success

After a successful 20-year career with the New England Patriots, Tom Brady went to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2020.

The business that Gronkowski and his wife built was thriving and he was professionally happy. But, a small part of him wanted to start his own business that he built from the ground up.

Following a trip to the gym, Gronkowski was frustrated with his protein shaker and took it upon himself to develop an all-purpose cup that could be used at, and outside, the gym. Through his passion, determination, and a very hands-on approach, Gronkowski built Ice Shaker.

Just because you experience some level of career success, doesn’t mean you should stop pushing yourself for more. I always say that if your career isn’t growing, it’s dying.

Gronkowski could’ve been content working at his wife’s business, but by pushing himself to start his own business, he became a true entrepreneur. As he continues to grow professionally, he’ll get to define what success means to him.

In Brady’s case, many outside voices say he’s the greatest football player ever and he had nothing left to achieve. Some even said that his skills declined and he should retire because 43-year-olds can’t play football at a high-level.

Brady ignored all the noise and has reached the unique point in his football career where he’s still raising the bar. He seems to love what he does and is still defining his success. We should all be so lucky.

I think that type of determination will serve him well in his future endeavors beyond football.

Brand Or Be Branded

@chrisgronkowski

It’s way more than a game ##thegronks ##football ##nextgeneration ##nflplayers ##nfl ##nflfootball

♬ original sound – chrisgronkowski

This is one of my favorite sayings and Gronkowski is the perfect example of the importance of building a personal brand.

Despite his business success, there were still some people who viewed Gronkowski as a “dumb jock” or as “Rob Gronkowski’s brother.” To change that narrative, Gronkowski took to TikTok and answered questions about life as a pro football player, fitness, and entrepreneurship. This level of engagement made people want to know more about Gronkowski, which benefited both him and his business.

Now people don’t just view Gronkowski as a former jock, but rather an engaging personality and entrepreneur. Gronkowski has taken control of the narrative, and will continue to use social media to build his brand.

While it may seem like Brady may play football forever, even he knows that it will end at some point. Brady already has his TB12 health and recovery brand, and has been a lot more active on social media.

People are starting to get a small look of what Tom Brady is like outside of football. I wouldn’t be surprised if Brady really opens up his social media more in the next couple of years. Whether he decides to continue building TB12 or pursue other endeavors, Brady probably knows that some people will only view him as a former athlete and he’ll have to work to build his brand outside of football.

Whether you’re a professional athlete , or CEO, we all face similar challenges and choices in our careers. If you want to be successful, you have to be willing to make the tough choice and tackle all challenges head on.

Looking for an added edge for your job search?

Join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

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4 Ways To Edit Your Resume Like A Professional Resume Writer

By Advice Column

Professional resume writers take on the mindset of the employer and recruiter when crafting and editing resumes. To edit your resume like a professional resume writer, you have to develop a fresh mindset.


If that means taking a break from your resume for a day or two before going back to it, that’s what you will have to do.

Candidates often spend so much time on their resume that they can no longer give it an objective review. Many candidates are also challenged with writing their own resume because they are so involved in their own experiences. They are unable to offer a macro view of their experience and achievements, and rather than focusing on information that is important to a potential employer—like quantifiable accomplishments—they are stuck focusing on mundane daily tasks of the job that are less impactful on a resume.

To tackle your resume like a professional resume writer, have an open mind and think like the employer or recruiter you are applying to.

Here are some general rules to follow as you edit your resume:

1. Show What You Do Well

Identify the top five skill sets that an employer wants in the perfect candidate, which they’ve mentioned in the job description. Then, focus your resume on how you’ve achieved great things leveraging these skills.

For instance, if you are applying for a sales position, your focus should be on quota achievement, account penetration, prospecting, and closing techniques. Don’t sway from focusing on the core skills an employer wants.

2. Remove What’s Irrelevant

Man edits his resume during a job search

In most instances, a hiring manager makes a decision of whether you are an appropriate candidate for a call back after reviewing your resume for only a few seconds. Rarely is every line on your resume read in its entirety. The more information on your resume that is relevant, the quicker the hiring manager will come to the conclusion that you are a good candidate to call.

However, if your resume includes too much irrelevant information, you increase your chances of being dismissed. So, in the end, the less an employer finds irrelevant on your resume, the more impactful it is. You are better leaving off information that doesn’t offer much to an employer, including resume fluff. Just don’t do it.

3. Don’t Be Afraid To Market Yourself

Woman editing her resume before applying for a job

For a resume to have impact, you have to market yourself. Every aspect of what you put on your resume should sell. Take all of your experiences, skills, and capabilities, and position it in a manner to sell. The information on a resume should present itself in a manner that says, “This is what I have achieved before, and this is what I can do for you.”

Many resumes don’t sell simply because they are poorly focused. For instance, just because your job was to bag groceries does not mean that is the information you put on your resume. You can make it more marketable by indicating how your customer service skills helped maintain customer satisfaction, resulting in returning customers. (Make sure you use numbers to quantify your work experience!) Your statement is not a lie. It is simply reframing information in a way that shows more relevance for the job.

4. Look Out For Common Mistakes

Man editing and fixing mistakes on his resume

Minor mistakes such as spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors are avoidable. However, many resumes that are not carefully proofread contain such mistakes that are cause for dismissal by the hiring manager.

Of all the reasons for a resume to be dismissed, don’t let these easy fixes be one of them. Ask a friend or family member to give it a review. You need another pair of eyes or at the very least, a fresh pair of eyes. Remove yourself from your resume for some time before giving it a good review. When you stare at a resume too long, it makes it harder to detect and edit mistakes.

Download Work It Dailyu2019s free resume mistakes guide

Reviewing and editing your resume like a professional resume writer can make a significant impact. It is often the difference between actually securing interview opportunities for jobs and spending valuable time continuously searching and applying for new opportunities to only receive no response in return.

Need more help with your resume? We’re here for you!

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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3 Ways Professional Should Respond To Job Rejection

By Advice Column

You polished your resume and sent it to the right person, along with a stellar cover letter. You got a call.

You aced the interview.

You were brought back in—twice!

You sent thank you notes after each interview, to each interviewer.

Your follow up was polite and appropriate.

You were told you were a finalist.

The HR person thought it was looking good for you…yet, they gave the job to someone else.


After all that effort and waiting and wondering. After joking with the receptionist about being a “regular” in the lobby. After establishing what seemed like a genuine rapport with the executive in charge of the department. After what the HR person said about it looking good…

Yes, it’s a disappointment. But in spite of what you might think, all is not lost. What can you do to maximize your chances of having some good come out of this seeming loss? Here are three ways you should react to a particularly disappointing job rejection.

Be Gracious

Yes, you were obviously the best candidate, at least as far as you could tell. And maybe some of the people on the other side of the interview desk thought so, too. But a decision was made, no matter how difficult. And it’s time to touch base one more time with a thank you note to all involved for their time and consideration.

Be A Resource, If You Can

HR manager has a long conversation with a potential employee.

If there’s some topic that was discussed and piece of information that the interviewer wished they had, track it down. If the interviewer wanted to connect with someone you know, offer to make the introduction. There’s not always an opportunity like this, but if there is, take advantage of it.

By doing this, you’re not only being professional about the rejection, but it’s also opening to add the hiring manager to your professional network. Consider connecting with this person on LinkedIn down the line.

As they say, “Out of sight, out of mind,” so try to stay on the hiring manager’s radar.

Keep The Door Open

Young woman and HR manager discuss the next steps after she is rejected from a job she applied to.

Even though you didn’t get the job, it’s important to reiterate your respect and admiration for the company, and the fact that you would like to work there. It’s okay to say, “If another position comes up—or if the candidate you hired doesn’t work out—I would still love the opportunity to join the team over there.”

A sentence like this can cement you in their minds as the backup or as the first person to be called when something else becomes available.

HR officials will sometimes forward resumes of promising candidates to colleagues at other companies for their open positions. Getting the original job is just one good outcome of the job interviewing process. Consider a “near miss” at getting hired one more step in building your reputation for overall career success.

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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